Student’s inspect their hives

Student’s inspect their hives

Every week our student’s inspect their hives.  They get to see the hives develop and get to compare them to each other.  Every hive is different, some grow faster, gather more nectar,etc.  Some grow rapidly, some barely grow at all.  Our students get to see it all, hives that go queenless, how to combine hives, how to make splits and all the other normal tasks of beekeeping.

Students

Students

Here are two of our students inspecting a hive May 28th.

The hives are growing and the students are learning more every week.  We couldn’t be happier with how the year is going so far.

Bees4Vets apiary June 4 2018

Bees4Vets apiary June 4 2018

This is the apiary as of June 4, 2018.  Most of the hives are doing great and we’ve gotten a couple of spare queens mated.

Virgin Queen 051818

When checking a hive today, we found it ready to swarm. (If it hasn’t already, couldn’t find the original queen, but the hive was overflowing with bees.) The pic is of a virgin queen. When we pulled a frame, the cell split off of the frame. One of our volunteers looked and said their was a bee in it and split open the cell and out she came. She sat on his glove and licked at the honey on it for a little bit and then crawled off onto a frame we put into a split.

One of two virgin queens we found today along with 3 more splits worth of really big, healthy looking queen cells. So, one 4 box high 8 frame hive (all medium boxes) made 5 splits and still have a really healthy hive left.

It was really cloudy and trying to rain, so we couldn’t look real hard for a queen in the remaining hive. If there isn’t one when we go back, we’ll merge one of the splits back into this hive after they’ve mated or merge a nuc we have as a place for a spare queen into the hive.

Nuc install 042118

Ginger is teaching our students how to install a nuc (nucleus colony) into an 8 frame hive.